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Supplement Spotlight: Glutamine

FAQ on GLUTAMINE

 

Glutamine is one of the 20 amino acids encoded by the genetic code. Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid, meaning it can be produced by the body and is involved in a variety of metabolic processes. Glutamine has recently been re-classified as a conditionally essential amino acid. This means that while the body can make glutamine, under extreme physical stress the demand for glutamine exceeds the body's ability to synthesize it. During times of stress glutamine reserves are depleted and need to be replenished through supplementation. Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the body. Over 61% of skeletal muscle tissue is glutamine.

 

Glutamine is involved in more metabolic processes than any other amino acid. Glutamine is converted to glucose when more glucose is required by the body as an energy source. Glutamine also plays a part in maintaining proper blood glucose levels and the right pH range. It serves as a source of fuel for cells lining the intestines. Without it, these cells waste away. It is also used by white blood cells and is important for immune function. Glutamine increases the body's ability to secrete human growth hormone (HGH). HGH assists in metabolizing body fat and helps to support new muscle tissue growth.

 

The health benefits of glutamine include immune system regulation, nitrogen shuttling, oxidative stress, muscle preservation, intestinal health, injuries, and much more. Supplemental l-glutamine can be helpful in the treatment of arthritis, autoimmune diseases, fibrosis, intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcers, and connective tissue diseases. Glutamine is the primary source of energy for the various cells of the immune system. Strenuous exercise, viral and bacterial infections, and stress and trauma in general cause glutamine depletion that starves the immune cells. Glutamine has been shown to enhance the ability of medications to kill cancerous growths. Many people with cancer have abnormally low levels of glutamine. Glutamine protects the liver during toxic chemotherapy, during acetaminophen toxicity, and following a severe inflammatory injury to the liver. Glutamine is used to protect the lining of the small and large intestines from damage caused by chemotherapy or radiation. Glutamine can aid in healing stomach ulcers and prevent inflammation of the stomach that is caused by chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. L-glutamine levels have been found to be decreased in endurance athletes who train too often and at high intensity. Athletes with a strenuous training schedule may be able to reduce the risk of infections by supplementing with glutamine.

 

Pick up a bottle of Optimum Nutrition 1000mg Glutamine capsules at Emerge Fitness today!